Imagemapped Navigation Bar

LOVE is learning to be constructively creative.

"WebQuests ask students to solve authentic problems and answer questions that adults face."

Joyce Kasman Valenza, The Philadelphia Inquirer, 9/3/98.

Guides for Webquests with Students

Below is a list of the contents of this section. Click on any item in which you are interested for a fuller description and to reach the Internet link.

Building Blocks - Introduction to the basic components of a webquest.
Thoughts About WebQuests - Distinctions between long and short term webquests.
Example WebQuests - Links to a variety of teacher-developed webquests.
Making a WebQuest - Webquest which helps teachers create webquests.

 

Building Blocks of A WebQuest
This web site defines a web quest as "an inquiry-oriented activity in which some or all of the information that learners interact with comes from resources on the Internet." It also provides teachers with an orientation to the basic components of a webquest: an introductory organizer; description of learning task; links to related Internet resources; procedural steps; evaluation; and conclusion.

Thoughts About WebQuests
At this site, teachers will find clear distinctions drawn between long and short term webquests, as well as profiles of the types of thinking skills which can be developed in the context of a long term webquest.

Example WebQuests
This is a web site which provides links to a variety of webquests developed by teachers (elementary, middle, secondary), and also rates those which make fullest use of the instructional possibilities inherent in the webquest format.

Making a WebQuest
This site furnishes a webquest for assisting teachers interested in creating webquests for their students.

 

Webquests related to the 'Africans In America' Series

Below is a list of the contents of this section. Click on any item in which you are interested for a fuller description and to reach the Internet link.

Examining African American Slavery - Webquest on slavery for student teams.
The Underground Railroad - A webquest for middle school age students.
Webquest: All Men Are Created Equal - Webquest promoting multi-cultural understanding.

 

Examining African American Slavery in the United States of America: A Web Quest Looking At the Life of A Slave
Click on the University of Maine link, and then on the title link to access this webquest. The webquest begins with kidnapping into slavery in Africa, and asks students to assume the role of a slave to gain a slave's perspective of plantation life in the United States, to preserve his or her African heritage, and to find a way to escape to freedom. Working in teams of three, students construct a model of a plantation shelter, tape oral accounts describing their relationship with the master, roles in slave society, and the creation of a meaningful culture. They also dialogue with and write an autobiography of an underground railroad conductor, map an underground railroad escape route, organize the different parts of the project and make a presentation to the rest of the class. There are links to Internet resources connected with each student activity, plus a "teacher page" with curriculum standards, suggestions for curriculum integration, implementation guidelines and resources, and evaluation considerations.

The Underground Railroad: Webquest
This webquest was designed for use with small groups of middle school age students. It asks students to adopt specific roles, and identifies specific Internet sites for them to research.

Webquest: All Men Are Created Equal ... ?
Click on Bridgewater State College link, on Spring 1997 link, and then on title link to access this webquest. The goal of the webquest is to enable students to gain a better understanding of the experiences of the Cherokee (Trail of Tears), Japanese (Internment during World War II), and African-American (Civil Rights) people during their times of struggle. Incorporates online and print resources.

 

Examples of Webquests

Below is a list of the contents of this section. Click on any item in which you are interested for a fuller description and to reach the Internet link.

American Dreams - Webquest on past and present meanings of American dream.
Immigration: Angel vs. Ellis Island - Webquests comparing immigration experiences.
The Immigration Today Webquest - Long term webquest on present day immigration.
The Journey North - Webquest on immigrants from Central and South America.

 

Immediately following are examples of webquests which explore multiple meanings of the American dream and multicultural immigration experiences. The first focuses on researching the American dream as expressed by previous generations and by diverse groups in our society today. The others compare the immigration experiences of people who came to the United States through two different points of entry (east coast and west coast); challenge students to explore present day immigration issues; and dramatize the experiences of more recent immigrants from Central and South America.

American Dreams Through the Decades
American Dreams is a webquest designed as an interdisciplinary project for upper elementary, middle school, and high school classes. It challenges students to use the primary source materials contained in the Library of Congress' American Memory collection to research the meaning of the American dream for previous generations (19th and 20th century) and for different groups in contemporary American society, and to define how their dreams will become part of America's future. The site features a "teaching page" which provides guidance related to content areas and grades, curriculum standards, resources needed, implementation, and assessment/evaluation. It also includes a "student page" and a special section to help with exploring the resources in the American Memory collection.

Immigration: Angel Island vs. Ellis Island
(Click on San Francisco State University link. Click on EDT 728.1. Click on projects, and click on the title of the webquest to access it.) In this webquest, students compare the immigration experiences of people entering the United States during the late 19th and early 20th century, focusing on two points of entry: Angel Island and Ellis Island. Students "participate" in the immigration process via a simulation in which individual students assume one the following roles: examining physician, immigration official, newly arrived immigrant/family member, journalist, or civil servant. At the web site, they hear the voices of the immigrants, read about their struggles and see photographs which enhance their learning experiences.

The Immigration Today Webquest
This long term webquest challenges students to examine multiple dimensions and perspectives related to present day immigration. Students are asked to choose roles, research Internet links, interview members of immigrant or refugee groups, and produce a joint product (print or electronic).

The Journey North: Issues of Immigration
(Click on San Francisco State University link. Click on EDT 728.1. Click on projects, and click on the title of the webquest to access it.) A webquest which takes students on a journey into different countries in Central and South America and asks them to assume the roles of immigrants. After completing basic research, they participate in an immigration trial which dramatizes the struggle between immigrants seeking residency and government agencies trying to limit immigration.


Part I: Beginning with the Basics

Primary Sources
Oral Interviews
WebQuests

Return to Home Page

Part II: Tapping Teaching Resources

Family Roots
Neighborhood/Community Histories
Service Learning Projects